PP2 Curriculum 

Autumn 2021

Pedagogy

Inquiry-based learning includes teaching methods built on students' individual knowledge and  interests, and emphasizes learning how to learn and how to find out, using both traditional and  contemporary media.

The Benefits of Inquiry-Based Learning: 

  • Enhances learning experiences for children. 
  • Teaches skills needed for all areas of learning.
  • Fosters curiosity in students.
  • Deepens students' understanding of topics. 
  • Allows students to take ownership of their learning.
  • Increases engagement with the material. 
  • Creates a love of learning.

Units of Inquiry

 

The most significant and distinctive feature of the Primary Years Program (PYP) are the six disciplinary themes. It is recognized that learning and teaching science and social studies as a subject, while necessary, is not sufficient. Of equal importance is the need to learn science and social studies in context, exploring content relevant to students, and transcending the boundaries of the traditional subject. The transdisciplinary themes provide the framework for a highly defined, focused, in-depth program of inquiry, and as science and social studies are relevant to all the transdisciplinary themes and learning should take place within this framework. In return, the knowledge and the application of that knowledge will enhance inquiries into the central ideas defined by the transdisciplinary themes.  
 
1. Who We Are:  

Inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; person, physical, mental, social and spiritual  health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and  responsibilities; what it means to be human.  

2. Where We Are in Place and Time:  

Inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries,  explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationship between and the interconnectedness of  individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives. 

3. How We Express Ourselves:  

Inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and  values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the  aesthetic.  

4. How the World Works:  

Inquiry into the natural world and its laws, the interaction between the natural world (physical and  biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the  impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.  

5. How We Organize Ourselves:  

Inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and  function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on  humankind and the environment.  

6. Sharing the Planet:  

Inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and  other living things; communities and the relationship within and between them; access to equal  opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

 

 

Unit of Inquiry Outcomes

1.    Our first unit will be on the theme “Who we are”
       Our behaviour impacts us and the lives of others.
●        Me and my interactions.
●        Making choices.
●        How our actions can make a difference.

 

2.    Our second unit will be on the theme “Where we are in place and time”
        Documenting personal histories allows us to reflect on and celebrate who we are and where we have come from.
●        Ways of documenting personal history.
●        Personal change from birth to present: self and family.
●        Reflecting on the past.

 

3.    Our third unit will be on the theme “How we express ourselves”
        Understanding our feelings helps us express ourselves in different ways.
●        Identification of our feelings.
●        Ways people express their feelings.
●        Our responsibility in expressing our feelings.

 

4.    Our fourth unit will be on the theme “How the world works”
        The Earth’s natural cycles influence the activity of living things.
●        Natural cycles.
●        Actions people take in response to the earth’s natural cycle.
●        Patterns of behaviour in living things related to Earth’s natural cycle.

Language

Language outcomes for the academic year is as follows:

1.       Oral Language-Speaking and Listening:
●        Spoken words connect us with others.
●        People listen and speak to share thoughts and feelings.
●        People ask questions to learn from others.

 

2.       Visual Language-Viewing and Presenting:
●        Visual language is all around us.
●        The pictures, images and symbols in our environment have meaning.
●        We can enjoy and learn from visual language.

 

3.       Written Language-Reading:
●        Illustrations convey meaning.
●        Print conveys meaning.
●        People read for pleasure.
●        Stories can tell about imagined worlds.
●        Printed information can tell about the real world.
●        There are established ways of setting out print and organising books.

 

4.       Written Language-Writing:
●        Writing conveys meaning.
●        People write to tell about their experiences, ideas and feelings.
●        Everyone can express themselves in writing.
●        Talking about our stories and pictures helps other people to understand and enjoy them.

 

Numeracy 

Mathematics is used to identify, describe and apply patterns and relationships. It provides a precise means  of communication and is a powerful tool for solving problems both within and beyond mathematics.
Students develop understanding and fluency in mathematics through inquiry, exploring and connecting  mathematical concepts, choosing and applying problem-solving skills and mathematical techniques,  communication, and reasoning. 
In numeracy the student will learn to describe mathematical situations and methods using everyday and some mathematical language, actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. The following concepts will be covered during the academic year.
 
1.       Whole Numbers:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
●        Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions
●        Counts to 30, and orders, reads and represents numbers in the range 0 to 20.

 

2.       Addition and subtraction:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
●        Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions.
●        Combines, separates and compares collections of objects, describes using everyday language, and records using informal methods.

 

3.        Multiplication and Division:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
●        Groups, shares and counts collections of objects, describes using everyday language, and records using informal methods.

 

4.       Fractions:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions
●        Describes two equal parts as halves.

 

5.       Patterns:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
●        Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions.
●        Recognises, describes and continues repeating patterns.

 

6.       Length:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions.
●        Describes and compares lengths and distances using everyday language.

 

7.       Volume and Capacity:
●        Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Describes and compares the capacities of containers and the volumes of objects or substances using everyday language.

 

8.       Mass:
●        Describe mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions.
●        Describe and compare the masses of objects using everyday language.
9.       Time:
●        Describe mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
●        Sequence events, uses everyday language to describe the durations of events, and reads hour time on clocks.

 

10.   Two Dimensional Shapes:
●        Describe mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
●        Use objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems
●        Manipulates, sorts and describes representations of two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, squares and rectangles, using everyday language

 

11. Three Dimensional Shapes:
●        Describe mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
●        Use concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions
●        Manipulate, sort and represent three-dimensional objects and describes them using everyday language

 

12.    Position:
●        Describe mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
●        Describe position and gives and follows simple directions using everyday language

 

13.   Data Handling
●        Describe mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings
●        Use concrete materials and/or pictorial representations to support conclusions
●        Represent data and interprets data displays made from objects

 

Literacy  

PP2 children have their literacy supported by our Get Reading Right program which develops a strong foundation for literary development in children. This synthetic phonic program (which means words are broken up into smaller units of sounds, called ‘phonemes’), helps children fast-track their reading and spelling abilities and has been shown to develop excellent skills in literacy.
●        Phonemes: The English language phonemes covered in Prep-2 are from our Get Reading Right Program.
 
Phonemes that will be covered:
●        (level 1-3) s, m, c, t, g, p, a, o, r, l, b, d, f, h, i, u, v, w, y, z, j, n, k, e, ll, ss, ff, zz, sh, ch, wh, th, ck, ng, qu, x
 
Our students will
●        Learn to match phonemes and letters together which help them to read and spell words.
●        Learn to blend phonemes together which helps them to read words.
●        Learn tricky words by sight.
●        Learn to listen for all the phonemes in a word and to write a letter for each one.
●        Learn that two or more letters can make one phoneme.
●        Learn to spell and write 3 - 5 letter words, and sentences using lower and upper case letters.  
●        Learn when to use the following: full stop, coma, question mark, exclamation mark, capitals for names and when beginning a sentence.
●        Tricky Word bank: I, the, was, to, are, she, day, of, a, he, today, for, all, is, me, no, they, said, you, play, this, come, my, have, like, do, says, what, going, give, away, see, look, very, once, we.