Grade 5

 

Grade 5 Curriculum 

Autumn 2020

Pedagogy

Inquiry-based learning includes teaching methods built on students' individual knowledge and  interests, and emphasizes learning how to learn and how to find out, using both traditional and  contemporary media.

 

The Benefits of Inquiry-Based Learning: 

  • Enhances learning experiences for children. 
  • Teaches skills needed for all areas of learning.
  • Fosters curiosity in students.
  • Deepens students' understanding of topics. 
  • Allows students to take ownership of their learning.
  • Increases engagement with the material. 
  • Creates a love of learning.
 

Units of Inquiry

 

The most significant and distinctive feature of the Primary Years Program (PYP) are the six disciplinary themes. It is recognized that learning and teaching science and social studies as a subject, while necessary, is not sufficient. Of equal importance is the need to learn science and social studies in context, exploring content relevant to students, and transcending the boundaries of the traditional subject. The transdisciplinary themes provide the framework for a highly defined, focused, in-depth program of inquiry, and as science and social studies are relevant to all the transdisciplinary themes and learning should take place within this framework. In return, the knowledge and the application of that knowledge will enhance inquiries into the central ideas defined by the transdisciplinary themes.  
 
1. Who We Are:  

Inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; person, physical, mental, social and spiritual  health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and  responsibilities; what it means to be human.  

2. Where We Are in Place and Time:  

Inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries,  explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationship between and the interconnectedness of  individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives. 

3. How We Express Ourselves:  

Inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and  values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the  aesthetic.  

4. How the World Works:  

Inquiry into the natural world and its laws, the interaction between the natural world (physical and  biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the  impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.  

5. How We Organize Ourselves:  

Inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and  function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on  humankind and the environment.  

6. Sharing the Planet:  

Inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and  other living things; communities and the relationship within and between them; access to equal  opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

 

 

Unit of Inquiry Outcomes

1. Theme: Who We Are 

 Central Idea: Celebrations around the world are a way of life. 

 Lines of Inquiry include; 

● Exploration of celebrations around the world. 
● Understand that celebrations are the expression of who we are. 
● Exploring that there are commonalities between the ways we celebrate.  

 

2. Theme: How the World Works 

Central Idea: All living things go through a process of change. 

Lines of Inquiry include; 

● The diversity of plant and animal life on Earth. 
● The developmental stages of living things. 
● Factors which influence change in living things. 

 

3. Theme: How We Express Ourselves 

Central Idea: Through art, people use different forms of expression to convey their ideas.

Lines of Inquiry include; 

● Explore diversity of art forms. 
● Learn how ideas can be expressed in different ways.  
● Understand different art forms.  

 

4. Theme: Where We Are in Place and Time 

Central Idea: Public areas strengthen communities and provide people with opportunities to connect.

Lines of Inquiry include; 

● Function of public areas. 
● How public areas connect people. 
● Responsibility towards public places.  

 

5. Theme Sharing the planet 

Central Idea: Water is essential for life. 

Lines of Inquiry include; 

● The sources of water. 
● How societies interact with water sources. 
● Responsibilities regarding water. 

 

6. Theme: How We Organize Ourselves 

Central Idea: In a workplace people share responsibilities towards a common purpose.

Lines of Inquiry include; 

● Understand the purpose of a workplace. 
● Explore the interconnectedness of people in a workplace. 
● Learn the function of a shared vision or common purpose.

 

Language 

Language outcomes for the academic year is as follows: 

1. Oral Language-Speaking and Listening:  

● Show an understanding that sounds are associated with objects, events and ideas, or with symbolic  representations of them.  
● Explain/demonstrate that an object or symbol may have different sounds or words associated with  it in different languages.  
● Be cognizant about the high degree of variability of language and its uses. 

 

2. Visual Language-Viewing and Presenting:  

● Identify, interpret and respond to a range of visual text prompts and show an understanding that  different types of visuals texts serve different purposes.  
● Use this knowledge to create their own visual texts for particular purposes. 

 

3. Written Language-Reading:  

● Show an understanding that languages can be represented visually through codes and symbols.  
● Extend their data bank of printed codes and symbols and are able to recognize them in new  contexts. 
● Understand that reading is a vehicle for learning, and that the combination of codes conveys  meaning.  

 

4. Written Language-Writing:  

● Show an understanding that writing is a means of recording, remembering and communicating.  
● Understand that writing involves the use of codes and symbols to convey meaning to others; that  writing and reading uses the same codes and symbols.  
● Show that writing can describe the factual or the imagined world.  

 

 

Numeracy 

Mathematics is used to identify, describe and apply patterns and relationships. It provides a precise means  of communication and is a powerful tool for solving problems both within and beyond mathematics. Students develop understanding and fluency in mathematics through inquiry, exploring and connecting  mathematical concepts, choosing and applying problem-solving skills and mathematical techniques,  communication, and reasoning. 

     In Numeracy the student will learn to describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and  some mathematical language, actions, materials, diagrams and symbols.  

     The following concepts will be covered during the academic year; 

1. Whole Numbers:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Use objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems. 
● Support conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how answers were obtained.
● Apply place value, informally, to count, order, read and represent two- and three-digit numbers. 

 

2. Addition and Subtraction:  

● Described mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Use objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems. 
● Support conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how answers were obtained.
● Use a range of strategies and informal recording methods for addition and subtraction involving one and two-digit numbers.

 

3. Multiplication and Division:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Use a range of mental strategies and concrete materials for multiplication and division.  

 

4. Fractions:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Represent and model halves, quarters and eighths. 

 

5. Patterns:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Use objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems. 
● Create, represent and continue a variety of patterns with numbers and objects. 

 

6. Area:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language, actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Measure, record, compare and estimate areas using uniform informal units. 

 

7. Volume and Capacity:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Support conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how answers were obtained.
● Measure, records, compares and estimates volumes and capacities using uniform informal units. 

 

8. Time:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Use objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems. 
● Describe, compare and order durations of events, and read half- and quarter-hour time. 

 

9. Two Dimensional Shapes:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Support conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how answers were obtained.
● Manipulate, sort, represent, describe and explore two-dimensional shapes, including quadrilaterals,  pentagons, hexagons and octagons.

 

10. Three Dimensional Shapes:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Sort, describes, represents and recognizes familiar three-dimensional objects, including cones,  cubes, cylinders, spheres and prisms. 

 

11. Position:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols 
● Represent and describe the positions of objects in everyday situations and on maps. 

 

12. Data Handling:  

● Describe mathematical situations and methods using every day and some mathematical language,  actions, materials, diagrams and symbols. 
● Support conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how answers were obtained. ● Gather and organize data, display data in lists, tables and picture graphs, and interpret the results. 

 

13. Length:  

● Use appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas.
● Select and use appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems.
● Check the accuracy of a statement and explain the reasoning used. 
● Measure, record, compare and estimate lengths, distances and perimeters in meters, centimeters  and millimeters, and measures, compares and records temperatures. 
 

 

Literacy  

● Our new and effective Literacy Program is called the LIFT (Literacy in Full Throttle). This program  helps improve our children’s literacy skills, including reading, writing and comprehension skills.

 ● Our children will have their LIFT online classes every morning from 9am-9:40 am, and we will email  each child with the name of their LIFT teacher. 

● LIFT will be delivered according to the students’ reading ability, rather than grade or phase levels.  Language lessons are aligned on the timetable so that LIFT is taught at the same time across Primary  grades. This allows students across PP2-Grade 6 to move to their various ability-based classes (based  on their LIFT level) for their LIFT lesson.

The LIFT lesson duration is 60 minutes per day within in person classes and 40 minutes online, 5 days per week. 

● Phonemes: The entire English language phonemes are covered over Grades 1-6.

 

A sample of the phonemes covered in  the LIFT program

● (level 1-3) s, m, c, t, g, p, a, o, r, l, b, d, f, h, l, u, v, w, y, z, j, n, k, e, ll, ss, ff, zz, sh, ch, wh, th, ck, ng,  qu, x,  

● (level 4) ee, ea, y, e, ie, igh, I, y, i-e, oa, ow, o, o-e, ay, ai, a, a-e, ue, ew, oo, u-e ● (level 5) r, rr, oi, oy, f, ff, ph, ou, ow, s, se, ss, ce, u, oo, oul, ar, ir, er, ur, or, au, aw, al, ore, air, ere,  ear, are, j, dge, ge, ch, tch, tu, ci, sh, ti, s, si  

● (level 6) th, th2, tch, qu, qu2, ch2, ch3, long a, a-e, a2, a1, ay, long e, e-e, e2, ee, ea, ie, ei, long i, i-e,  12, igh, y2, ie2, long 0 sounds, 0-e, o2, oa, ow2, ou2, oe, ough, long u, u-e, u2, ew2, ui2, eu, ng, ea2,  ar, a3, er, ir, ur, ear, wor, silent e- six reasons, or, ore, ur, o2r, oar, a4, aw, au, ar2, aug, ough5, oi, oi,  are, ir, ear, ei2, ey2, a2, ay, oo, ou3, u2, o3, ew, ui, ough2, oo2, u3, ow, ou, ough, c2, sc, j, g2, dge,  ge, ph, augh2, wr, ed, ed2, ed3, y, ey, a5, u2  

● Comprehension topics include: Visualizing, Predicting/Inferring, Questioning, Comprehension  Monitoring, Determining Importance, Making Connections, Summarizing. 

● The LIFT Program includes the 5 essential components of Reading instruction 

 

Hours of Learning 

Home Room Teacher: 

● Monday - Friday 

  •  Morning: 9 am to 9:30am | 9:45am to 10:45am  
  •  Afternoon: 12:00pm to 12:40pm 

Languages: Choose one of the following options; 

  • Telugu OR  Hindi 

Add On: 

  • Choose another Indian Language or Foreign language. (French) 

Art:  

  •  Monday  
  • Afternoon: 2:15pm - 2:55pm